Personal blog. I post about black and queer issues, Star Trek, and other bits of nerd fandoms.

 

devynmunoz:

crazyideasfromaweirdperson:

Dear parents of LGBT+ young people:

You should be less worried about your offspring being influenced into their LGBT+ identities by people they met online, and more worried about the fact that they go online to meet people that will give them the acceptance and support that you haven’t.

This needs more notes

(Source: crazyideasfromawhiteperson)

bitteroreo:

atane:

briteboy89:

pandifreyan:

mcgarrygirl78:

ceallaig1:

human-cartography:

kid-wiccan:

coming out to your parents

If you try for one second to tell me the X-Men isn’t an allegory for the gay rights movement, I will smack you. They weren’t even remotely subtle about this.

The mutants have always been an allegory for anyone that didn’t fit in to society. The folks who drew the comics made a point of that early on.

It’s not just the gay rights movement, its not just kids trying to “come out” to their parents.  Its people being mistreated by the government, put away, forced to pretend to be “normal”, systematically oppressed, even killed for who they are because the powers that be cant control it.  It’s an allegory for blacks, gays, the disabled (mentally and physically), women, and anyone really who isnt a white man at the top of the food chain.

Seriously guys… Malcom X and Martin Luther King Jr are Professor X and Magneto. Legacy virus is HIV. X-men is a flawless comic.

Flawless commentary is flawless

Meh. Not this again.

People never get tired of reminding us of the allegories of the X-men and civil rights. I personally don’t care for allegories that consists of 2 powerful white men leading an ensemble of mostly powerful white people. I’m a comic lover and I understand the point Stan Lee and Jack Kirby were making. I enjoy X-men for what it is, a fantasy. I’m not going to use it for deep social commentary, despite the idealistic intentions of the creators.

I can see and listen to actual marginalized people. I’m on the margins myself and so is everyone around me and in my community. Allegories like this are for people who aren’t paying attention or listening to communities on the margins. I can’t imagine a Black lesbian for instance being excited about the X-men as an allegory for her life. I’ll make an educated guess and say that the only people who view allegorical narratives like the X-men as profound are probably white. I’m definitely not impressed by all powerful white characters used in place as allegories of systems put in place by real life powerful white people i.e. white supremacy.

The day when a white man shooting lasers from his eyes and an angry, furry dudebro with retractable adamantium claws start shedding light on my experiences as someone on the margins is the day when pigs fly.

Also, the allegory of Professor X as MLK Jr and Magneto as Malcolm X feeds into the dichotomy of one guy being respectable and the other being violent and ruthless. It is deeply flawed. People continue to promulgate this simplistic narrative of MLK Jr and Malcolm X and it’s dangerous. Magneto is a mutant who wants to destroy humankind (allegory for white people?) because he thinks mutants are superior. He is filled with hatred and contempt for humankind. He leads the “Brotherhood of Evil Mutants” (allegory for the Nation of Islam?).

Magneto’s sole purpose is ridding the world of humankind. That’s a horrible allegory of Malcolm X. That isn’t Malcolm X. That’s a white man’s interpretation of Malcolm X misrepresented as Magneto and his followers.

If Stan Lee and Jack Kirby wanted to really make a statement, they should have made the five original X-men Black since Black resistance to white supremacy was the preeminent struggle that inspired them. Forgive me for not giving a shit about their allegories when their inaugural champions of justice and vanguards of truth were white people. Even when inspired by Black resistance and Black suffering, the end result was still whiteness.

*Sips* BLOOP BLOOP.

(Source: sebastianslan)

bungiesdestiny:

IGN has come out with a video demonstrating the abilities of a level 29 Titan

It’s awesome.

We also got some interesting tidbits of information from this video, starting with how you progress past level twenty.

"You have reached Level 20.

To increase your Level above 20, find and
equip armor which contains Light.

Earning XP now creates Motes of Light.”

So I would take two things from this.
1. Motes of light are what you earn instead of levels when you fill the XP bar. You can trade these in for high level weapons, armor, and class specific items.
2. You get past level twenty by your gear level, instead of your experience levels. This is a pretty common thing to see in MMOs like WOW when you hit endgame.
EDIT 3. It also looks like Light is an actual stat btw.

It also shows off some cool exotic items and the perks of them as well.For example, the Red Death (a scout rifle AKA single shot weapon) gets burst fire.

blackfolksmakingcomics:

Lightning.

Amanda Waller.

Milestone Media’s Rocket.

Thunder.

Bumblebee.

Vixen.

Representation matters, kids. 

(Source: fanbingblink)

the-voidwalker asked
So... You guys have class teams? I would like to join team Warlock!

bungiesdestiny:

Haha it’s more of just “I like Hunter/Titan/Warlock” than actual teams, but consider yourself on team Warlock.

I am a captain of #TeamWarlock.

We will not concede the sartorial struggle to the Hunters.

stormingtheivory:

I find it really interesting that there’s two different ways of using the term “feminist” in media criticism. One means “this film (or whatever) is empowering to women in accordance with Feminisms aims,” while the other means something like “this film (or whatever) addresses themes of masculinity, femininity, and female subjectivity that would be impossible to address without feminist theoretical frameworks, but may be profoundly ambivalent about power and the characters portrayed.”

I think this is probably a major factor in disagreements about whether a particular work is “feminist”

stormingtheivory:

betweenrealities:

stormingtheivory:

bengiyo:

stormingtheivory:

Also can we talk about how the ONE huge example that is always trotted out as proof that fanfiction is teh evils is from Marion Zimmer Bradley, a defender of child molesters and a child molester herself? While I’m not saying that the two things are linked, I AM saying that maybe the big name SF/F authors who always chorus “B-b-b-b-but MZB!!!” should think a little bit about whether the side of the story that they heard is the REAL story, given that this is a person now outed as a concealer of horrific crimes? Did we ever actually hear the story from the perspective of the fan involved in the case?

I’ve always seen the anti-fan fiction arguments as more attempts to enforce the institutional power of publishers. I mean, why else to hate on it so much? 

If it’s an argument about quality or content, I don’t really like R. A. Salvatore’s work. I’ve read a few of his books and cannot get why people are so obsessed with Drizzt Do’urden (sp?) as much as they are, and I’ve been done with Mercedes Lackey because of the overly graphic descriptions of rape in her work that is completely off-putting when I’m trying to read some positive queer stories. 

People are experimenting with writing. They’re either writing their own stories or playing around in other universes. What higher compliment can your work have if it isn’t that others feel compelled to add to your work and take it further?

Hell, the entire Star Wars Expanded Universe is basically poorly-maintained and contradictory licensed fan fiction. Same for Star Trek. 

It’s just…if we laud people sitting around listening to music and then trying to make their own and let them cite other artists as their inspirations, why are we so down on the same thing in writing?

This last bit is a really interesting comparison. Like, the kid buying his first six string and learning all his favorite songs is an American mythological staple. And we’re all ostensibly supposed to emulate Hemingway’s style all the time forever… but not use his characters? Weird shit.

Oh god, this is my belief so much. I have so much trouble explaining it to people, but this is why I write the things I write.

I’ve noticed, too, that music has a lot more leeway in retelling narratives than written fiction. Like, take The Megas, who have made a career out of reinterpreting the story of Mega Man. I think that’s awesome. But if I do it in a prose piece, then suddenly it’s evil nasty “illegal” fanfiction. For some reason, the written word scares overzealous corporate-type folks more than anything else. Or music has a different relationship to narrative somehow.

As for the MZB case, I’ve actually read some stuff that suggests that it wasn’t a case of a fanfic writer suing an author for using her idea, but a ghostwriter suing a ghostwritten author for not being paid.  And it’s similarly not surprising, from what you’re saying about MZB (an author I don’t really know), that she’d be the type to present the situation in a self-aggrandizing manner. Actually, let me see if I can track those sources down…

http://nihilistic-kid.livejournal.com/1470621.html?thread=20753821#t20753821

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/rec.arts.sf.written/JkmjWyZBdbg/-cE1Xj7bwYAJ

http://nielsenhayden.com/makinglight/archives/007464.html#122173

Ah, yeah, there we go. Though people are tossing around the term “fanfic” as if the entire contents of fanfiction.net were the subject of the debate, it really seems to me that this is a conversation about authorization for paid work (expaned universe stuff) and paid ghostwriting. In that case, the great story of an author losing control of their own work is…unsurprisingly, a scare tactic meant to intimidate authors into keeping an iron grip on their copyright.

So, yeah, as a fanfiction author and aspiring nonfanfiction author, that informs my take on the situation somewhat.

Woah! I did NOT expect, when I wrote that post, that the other side of the story was actually available! Thanks so much, this is fantastic, and really spins the whole thing in a dramatically different way. o_o

This is even more fascinating, if we’re still comparing music and prose, with how so many of the biggest pop songs are written by other creatives. Some of the bigger serials rely on ghost writers. For example, I’ve gone back and started rereading the Animorphs books, and a lot of them are ghost written with K. A. Applegate’s supervision.

stormingtheivory:

bengiyo:

stormingtheivory:

Also can we talk about how the ONE huge example that is always trotted out as proof that fanfiction is teh evils is from Marion Zimmer Bradley, a defender of child molesters and a child molester herself? While I’m not saying that the two things are linked, I AM saying that maybe the big name SF/F authors who always chorus “B-b-b-b-but MZB!!!” should think a little bit about whether the side of the story that they heard is the REAL story, given that this is a person now outed as a concealer of horrific crimes? Did we ever actually hear the story from the perspective of the fan involved in the case?

I’ve always seen the anti-fan fiction arguments as more attempts to enforce the institutional power of publishers. I mean, why else to hate on it so much? 

If it’s an argument about quality or content, I don’t really like R. A. Salvatore’s work. I’ve read a few of his books and cannot get why people are so obsessed with Drizzt Do’urden (sp?) as much as they are, and I’ve been done with Mercedes Lackey because of the overly graphic descriptions of rape in her work that is completely off-putting when I’m trying to read some positive queer stories. 

People are experimenting with writing. They’re either writing their own stories or playing around in other universes. What higher compliment can your work have if it isn’t that others feel compelled to add to your work and take it further?

Hell, the entire Star Wars Expanded Universe is basically poorly-maintained and contradictory licensed fan fiction. Same for Star Trek. 

It’s just…if we laud people sitting around listening to music and then trying to make their own and let them cite other artists as their inspirations, why are we so down on the same thing in writing?

This last bit is a really interesting comparison. Like, the kid buying his first six string and learning all his favorite songs is an American mythological staple. And we’re all ostensibly supposed to emulate Hemingway’s style all the time forever… but not use his characters? Weird shit.

Exactly! 

I think there are always some interesting conversations that come out of fan fiction. In the Star Trek fandom, I’ll read some fan fiction every now and then that puts a particular character as being far more aggressive than I ever imagined them being. While it’s a bit disorienting at first, I think it’s fascinating to go back and think about all of the on-screen portrayals of that character and see what made the writer perceive a character that way. 

It’s also hilarious to me how queer fan fiction is sometimes. You’ve got all of these people clamoring for these types of stories that they decided to write it themselves since the establishment is completely against it.

It’s such a cool, and much older than believed, space of creative people openly sharing their creations with each other. It’s a celebratory act, and I guess the only reason capitalism hates it so much is that it’s a lot harder to monetize.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a woman who’s easy to cheer for.

The Supreme Court justice stands at five-feet, one-inch tall. She was the second woman ever appointed to America’s highest bench, the first female Jew. She’s a grandma.

And most importantly, she’s a breathtakingly accomplished legal scholar who’s not afraid to stand up to her largely conservative male peers. Even aside from her extremely eloquent, impassioned dissent against Monday’s ruling on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, it might be expected that those who oppose the decision would rally behind “the Notorious RBG” and her defense of women’s reproductive rights—she’s a living representation of intelligent, feminist defiance.

Emma Green, Blame It On the Patriarchy, The Atlantic, (July 3, 2014). (via notoriousrbg)